Outraged Yet Undeterred In Our Fight For Climate Justice – Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network Responds to US Withdrawal from Paris Climate Accord

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June 2, 2017

Following the announcement by Donald Trump regarding his decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Accord, the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International expresses our outrage and disapproval, and commits to ever-stronger resistance, solidarity, and action across communities, issues, and borders as we rise with allies globally to protect and defend our lands, waters, climate, and children’s futures.

Our thoughts today are with frontline communities who bare the brunt of accelerating climate impacts. We stand in solidarity with our allies from the Amazon, to the Arctic, to the shores of Pacific Island Nations and countless places in between, as we continue to organize ceaselessly to end extraction of fossil fuels and the destruction of the planet for profit and power.

With seven years of engagement with the UNFCCC, WECAN maintains a strong critique of the Paris Agreement, which dangerously lacks a climate justice framework; fails to directly mention fossil fuels despite scientists telling us that 80% of all reserves must remain in the ground; promotes false solutions based on continued commodification of the Earth; and omits operative language on Indigenous and nature rights, and a full gender analysis. However despite these failures, the Paris Agreement remains an unprecedented and remarkable accomplishment in international negotiations, in recognizing that the climate crisis is real, urgent, and that governments must respond in an immediate and meaningful manner.

Trump’s decision to remove the US is self-serving, reckless, unjust and immoral – and stands in glaring opposition to the wishes of the US population, the majority of whom support US involvement in the Paris Climate Accord. It is a move that is illogical, un-strategic and deeply damaging in the diplomatic, political, economical and ecological arenas – with far reaching repercussions for international relations and global climatic health.

The Administration’s reasoning that withdrawal was needed to protect US jobs and economy from an overly demanding accord is simply false, and rather than see a strengthening in either of these spheres, we are likely to see the world forge ahead towards renewable energy and sustainable economies, while the US chokes on the stagnant and poisonous air of its oil-baron driven policies.  

In choosing to continue down the path of economic disparity, corporate greed, environmental racism and commodification of nature, the Trump administration fails to see the stark reality of the climate crisis – a crisis that can only be addressed through confronting and transforming the systemic injustices of our political, social and economic systems from the bottom up.

Fundamentally, the withdrawal is an act of violence against not only citizens of the United States – but against all of humanity and life on Earth. In particular, it is an act of violence against Indigenous people’s, communities of color, low-income and frontline communities, and nations of the Global South, who face direct hardship and life threatening circumstances everyday from mounting climate impacts. Women worldwide, and most especially from these impacted communities, will also bear the brunt of the Trump Administrations regressive choices, as they experience first and worse the effects of spreading infectious disease, food and water insecurity and extreme weather, amongst other impacts.

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network finds this wholly unacceptable. In failing to deliver on already dangerously low commitments that the Paris Climate Accord calls for, the current US Administration is bucking its historic responsibility to act, and instead is showing its true face to the world in an ultimate demonstration of its perverse willingness to put profit and corporate privilege over the very lives and futures of people and planet.

However, in this reprehensible moment, the voices of peoples movements, civil society, forward thinking businesses and governments are rising louder than ever to reject climate change denial and attempts to stagnate progress on a climate agreement which, while insufficient and flawed, represents the culmination of decades of work and an unprecedented hope for committed global action on climate.

Leaders of the global movement for climate justice understand that true changes come from the grassroots up – and that it has always been, and will ultimately always be, about concerted local action and local solutions-building to topple structures of oppression and injustice to re-build a livable world for all. Trump has pulled the US out of the Paris Accord, however he will never be able to prevent the continued growth and blossoming of the stunning diversity of solutions and resistance strategies already in motion and growing stronger everyday.

Today and everyday, we the people must speak up and take action without fail. We must continue to organize, claim our community power, and actively build the world that we envision, in resistance to institutions that refuse to break with neoliberal economic agendas and worldviews based on extraction and domination.

If we are to surmount the great challenges we face, we must double down on our efforts to support the leadership of women and frontline communities, collaborate across borders, and creatively build forward with renewed urgency as we take action on all fronts – in the streets, the courtrooms, the forests, the halls of government, the classrooms and the fields.

As the histories shared with us by our Indigenous allies and allies of the Global South make clear, the United States  has reneged on countless treaties and agreements. It is up to us to  be discerning, wise and strong in our action to simultaneously fight back and denounce this dangerous decision, while also turning our energy forward towards the positive solutions that cannot and will not ever be broken by the Trump Administration’s acts of violence and ignorance.

Our work, the work that will define our time and the lives of generations to come, is calling to us now. We as a people’s movement must rise up like the immune system of the Earth herself to demand just, decentralized and democratic systems, to actively build the world that we seek – and to respect and love our magnificent, life-giving planet.

Please join us in action: PARTICIPATE  in our upcoming Women for Climate Justice TrainingsWATCH our call to action videoLEARN about our work in the world.

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Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network representatives in action in Paris during COP21 alongside allies from the Ecuadorian Amazon – Photo via Emily Arasim/WECAN International

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COP22 Marrakech: Women Rising for Climate Justice

Blog by Emily Arasim and Osprey Orielle Lake

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During WECAN’s public event, ‘Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change – Marrakech’ a group of attendees and speakers gather to raise their voices in solidarity with women Earth defenders across the globe

At the close of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP22 climate talks in Marrakech, the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International reaffirms that women around the world stand at the forefront of the climate crisis, and are leading the way forward to address issues of social and ecologic justice, build a just transition to renewable energy, and to create a livable future for all. They stand in diversity, strength, resistance and love to denounce exploitation of the Earth and her peoples – taking action both within the UNFCCC and governmental processes, and with their communities, on the frontlines, in the streets, in the fields and in the forests. 

Women for climate justice will not wait for stagnated politicians nor rely on change within broken systems – we will continue to make our struggles and solutions known within the ‘halls of power’, and we will simultaneously push back and move forward to build the other world that we know is possible. Frontline, Indigenous and grassroots women from the Imider movement in Morocco to the Amazon rainforest in South America – from Standing Rock in the US, to Small Islands Nations of the Maldives and Marshall Islands, and countless places in between are all calling for an end to extractivism and immediate action to protect water, land and climate for all generations present and future.

There were several bright spots at the climate talks that will open doors in the process as we go forward, yet for the most part, as we have seen time and again, peoples and women’s movements worldwide are clearly stating that government action is not nearly ambitious enough given the urgency of the climate crisis we face. Despite being promoted as the “COP of action” – the past two weeks were filled with far too much familiar talk and hollow calls for ‘ambitious action’ left unfulfilled.

The United Nations itself confirms that under the Paris Climate Accord, which calls for action to limit global temperature rise to no more than 1.5 degree Celsius, current commitments by governments take us to a catastrophic 3 degrees rise. This is a reality that the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, and our frontline, grassroots and Indigenous women partners and  allies across the world simply refuse to accept.

Coming out of COP22, we denounce lack of action by wealthy countries and nations of the Global North, who continue to skirt their historic responsibility to act and provide meaningful support to those nations who are experiencing the life or death impact of the climate crisis now, and who have contributed the least to the accelerating degradation of the Earth’s ecosystems.

While many wealthy nations of the world continued to drag their feet and avoid serious commitment to climate action or financial support throughout COP22, forty seven developing nations united to create the Climate Vulnerable Forum and declare their intention to lead the green transition and work towards 100% renewable energy. We celebrate this positive momentum, and look forward to following this process to ensure that the transition that unfolds is just, decentralized, democratized and sustainable.

For a safe and livable world, we know there can be no more new fossil fuel development. Despite the ceaseless calls and actions of civil society leaders, this vital truth has not been fully acknowledged or acted upon by the majority of our world governments represented at COP22.

More over, climate talks in Morocco included unprecedented involvement of corporate interests who have consistently fought meaningful climate action, funded climate change denial and whose fundamental mission to extract and burn as much fossil fuels as possible stands in direct contradiction to the aims of the UNFCCC COP process.  Representatives of fossil fuel, mining, water privatization and industrial agriculture companies had a strong presence and access to most key meetings in Marrakech, including closed-door meetings with national representatives.

As we reflect on COP22, we are pleased to see some important forward momentum on the inclusion of gender-responsive climate action into the discourse of the climate negotiations. At long last, member states are no longer debating why gender is important, but rather seeking to understand how it can be acted upon. As member states seek to integrate gender into their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC’s), WECAN and our global partners and allies highlight the importance of projects not only designed for women, but by frontline women themselves.  The gender components of the Paris Agreement have been hard fought for over years by the dedicated efforts of the Women and Gender Constituency.

In light of the recent election of a climate skeptic and strong fossil fuel proponent as the next U.S. president, we also welcome the efforts and actions by the global community to reaffirm committed climate action despite political roadblocks and the dangerous implications of a Trump presidency. The Marrakech Action Proclamation is an important and strong show of global unity, however like the Paris Agreement itself,  it is not binding and represents goals that we have yet to see negotiators and members states put urgent and ambitious action behind given the rapid increase of global warming already being felt around the world.

We know that the international community and global peoples movements will move forward with or without full U.S. involvement, however, should the U.S. rescind on its Paris Agreement commitments, it will risk becoming a pariah state, and will show itself to be opposed to justice, peace, and the very life of future generations.  Even though the Paris Agreement is flawed and we do not support the false solutions promoted within it, it is imperative that the U.S. remain in the process and not abandon millions of people to accelerating climate chaos and disaster. Along with growing civil society networks, WECAN will continue to advocate ceaselessly for action by the U.S. regardless of the presidency.

We know our fight has just become exponentially larger, but we will never give up. We stand ever firmer in our commitment to protect and defend Mother Earth, courageous defenders of the land, all species, and the very web of life itself.  

Let it be known that diverse women around the world are not going to stop speaking out and demonstrating until we keep 80 % of fossil fuels reserves in the ground, stop deforestation and ocean pollution, implement gender equality, respect Indigenous rights and the rights of nature, and finance a just transition to 100% renewable energy. Our red line has been crossed, and we are rising. We will not stand idly by as temperatures continue to increase and Indigenous peoples and land defenders continue to be criminalized and persecuted.

It must be recognized that 80% of the bio-diversity left on Earth is in Indigenous lands and territories and Indigenous peoples put their bodies on the line every day to protect theses lands, forests and waterways. First and foremost we all should be supporting our Indigenous allies because they should not be facing brutal violence as they fight to stop the destruction of their homelands and life-ways, however, we also need to understand that everyone’s survival is interwoven and we cannot live without water, forests and air, and it is paramount that we fight together for Indigenous rights as a central climate solution. It is a tragedy that Indigenous rights was only left to the preamble of the Paris Accord and not the operative part of the text.

While our WECAN analysis places emphasis on the many flaws and failures of COP22 and the UNFCCC process, we reaffirm our continued commitment to action within and outside of climate talks and negotiations. We stand to make sure women’s voices are heard; to expose polluters and false solutions; to offer just solutions; and to spark vital conversation around topics including seed saving, soil and farming, tree planting, Indigenous sovereignty, ending market mechanisms and neoliberal economic models, rights of nature, Traditional Ecologic Knowledge, overconsumption and lifestyle change, and gender equality and women’s leadership at the forefront of all climate decision making.

EXPLORE this Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network blog for futher information on the actions, events and advocacy work that WECAN and allies participated in while on the ground in Morocco over the past two weeks.

Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change – Marrakech

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Women’s Leadership and Solutions in Facing Impacts of Climate Change Panel, featuring (left to right) Neema Namadamu (Democratic Republic of Congo) – Diana Donlon (USA) – Natalie Isaacs (Australia) – Amina El Hajjami (Amazigh Peoples, Morocco) – Nina Gualinga (Sarayaku Peoples, Ecuador)

On November 14th, the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network held a large public event in downtown Marrakech, gathering together worldwide women leaders to speak out against environmental and social injustice, draw attention to root causes of the climate crisis, and present the diverse array of visions and strategies with which they are working to shape a healthy and equitable world.

Over the course of four panel discussions and several keynote speeches, women leaders from Morocco, sub-Saharan Africa, Pacific Island Nations, North America, South America, Europe and Continental Asia spoke on diverse issues including women, seeds and soils; women’s resistance to fossil fuel extraction; women and forests; oceans; Indigenous struggles for sovereignty and Earth protection; violence against women land defenders; Traditional Ecologic Knowledge; and women’s leadership in climate policy and strategy, amongst many vital topics.

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Women Speak from the Frontlines of Climate Change Panel, featuring (left to right) – Thilmeeza Hussain (Maldives) – Carmen Capriles (translating, Bolivia) – Alicia Cahuiya (Huaorani Peoples, Ecuador) – Ruth Nyambura (Kenya) – Rachida Outouchki (Amazigh Peoples, Morocco) and her translator Marwa Natsheh of Palestine

We send the deepest gratitude to all of the outstanding speakers who shared their stories, struggles, calls to action and plans for real just action to address the climate crisis and global violations of human, Indigenous and nature’s rights. The event filled us and many who attended with inspiration, collective power, collaborative strategies and strength to continue ahead with the enormous work we must all engage in order to build a healthy and just world.

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Call to Action for the Protection and Rights of Defenders of the Land Panel featuring (left to right) Nicole Oliveira (Brazil) – Kayla DeVault (Shawnee/Anishinaabe Peoples, USA) – Cecilia Flores (Aymara Peoples, Chile) with Carmen Capriles (Bolivia) providing translation.

‘Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change – Marrakech’ featured: Her Excellency Hilda C. Heine (President of the Republic of the Marshall Islands); Honorable Mary Robinson (Mary Robinson Foundation: Climate Justice; Former President of Ireland); Neema Namadamu (SAFECO; Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network Democratic Republic of Congo); Rachida Outouchki (Amazigh Representative of the High Atlas Foundation, Morocco); Amina El Hajjami (Amazigh Representative of the High Atlas Foundation, Morocco); Ruth Nyambura (African Eco-Feminists Collective; No REDD in Africa Network; Health of Mother Earth Foundation, Kenya); Alicia Cahuiya (Huaorani Peoples, Amazon Rainforest, Ecuador); Simone Lovera (Global Forest Coalition, Paraguay); Diana Lopez (Southwest Workers’ Union; Global Grassroots Justice Alliance, USA); Jacqui Patterson (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Environmental and Climate Justice Program, USA); Thilmeeza Hussain (Former Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives; Climate Wise Women; Voice of Women, Maldives); Kalyani Raj (UNFCCC Women and Gender Constituency Representative, India); Nicole Oliveira (350.org Latin America, Brazil); Natalie Isaacs (One Million Women, Australia); Diana Donlon (Center for Food Safety, USA); Cecilia Flores (Abya Yala Women Messengers, Aymara Peoples, Chile); Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner (Climate Change Activist / Poet, Marshall Islands); Kayla DeVault (Shawnee/Anishinaabe Peoples, SustainUS Delegation, the Diné Policy Institute, USA); and Osprey Orielle Lake (Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, USA).

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Women’s Strategic Analysis, Policy and Advocacy for Systemic Change and Climate Justice Panel. Pictured left to right – Osprey Orielle Lake (USA) – Kalyani Raj ( India) – Diana Lopez (USA) – Simone Lovera (Paraguay) – Jacqueline Patterson (USA)

The event was opened with traditional Amazigh (Berber) songs by Yamna Oulamine and Nejma Ait Mansour of Morocco. We were also very honored by the presence of Fatima Khalloufi  and Aicha Abouh, two Amazigh women leaders of the community of Imider, Morocco, who are at the heart of one of the countries most critical movements, working for over 5 years to protect the water, life and Indigenous rights of the people of Imider from a disastrous silver mining operation on their land.

Click here for a look into the event, through the powerful words and poetry of Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner of the Marshall Islands.

Click here to read coverage of the event from Pacific Standard Magazine – How Women Are Going From Climate Victims to Climate Leaders

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Fatima Khalloufi (right) and Aicha Abouh (left) – women leaders of the Imider, #300km South movement in Morocco

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Alicia Cahuiya of the Huaorani peoples of Ecuador greets Marshall Island President, H.E. Hilda Heine and speaks about her struggles to protect her people’s lifeway and the Amazon Rainforest from continued oil extraction

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Yamna Oulamine and Nejma Ait Mansour Amazigh (Berber) women of Morocco open the event with traditional song

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Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner (Climate Change Activist / Poet, Marshall Islands) shares her powerful poem ‘Dear Matafele Peinem’ – Photo via Kaliea Frederick

International Climate March

On November 13th, thousands of people from across Morocco and around the word took to the streets of Marrakech to visibilize their social and ecologic struggles and send a strong messages to world governments meeting at COP22 that the peoples movement for climate justice will forge ahead with resistance and solutions regardless of the action, or lack thereof, from the political leadership of our countries. Calls by civil society included, no more polluters inside the COP, respect for Indigenous and women’s rights, Keep It In the Ground, 1.5 to stay alive, solidarity with Standing Rock, Imider and global struggles for Indigenous sovereignty, among many vital calls.

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Local Amazigh peoples and global Indigenous allies lead thousands during the Climate March in Marrakech – Photo by Emily Arasim/WECAN International

The march was led by Amazigh Indigenous people of Morocco, and Indigenous allies from all continents. The WECAN delegation was honored to march with many extraordinary women’s delegations and women’s groups from across the world.

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Scenes from the International Climate March in Marrakech. WECAN was honored to march with many strong women’s groups from around the world

Women’s Caucus and Women and Gender Constituency Advocacy

As participants in the Women’s Caucus and an ally of the UNFCCC Women and Gender Constituency, WECAN International supported the Women and Gender Constituency Key Demands at COP22.

During COP22, we saw the next steps of mainstreaming gender-responsive language and increased space for the voices of Indigenous and women’s groups. Significantly, Parties adopted a decision on gender and climate change which extends the 2014 Lima Work Programme on Gender, and at long last moved from debating why gender is important, to discussions on how to design and implement gender-responsive climate policies. There were many strong conversations on women and gender by national representatives and civil society organizations, however we maintain a strong critique of the lack of concrete action and financial commitments for the support of women on the frontlines of climate change.

We particularly want to honor our hard-working allies, including the Women’s Environment and Development Organization, Women in Europe for a Common Future, the All India Women’s Conference and others, who have advocated ongoingly for just and gender-responsive action at the UNFCCC. We also honor Founder of Reaccion Climatica,  WECAN partner and WECAN COP22 delegation member, Carmen Capriles, who worked actively as part of the Women and Gender Constituency, and who delivered the Constituencies final official intervention on the last night of COP22.

Press Conference – Women for Climate Justice Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change

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Global women for climate justice speak out during WECAN’s official COP22 press conference. Pictured left to right: Carmen Capriles, Marta Ventura, Ruth Nyambura, Neema Namadamu, Thilmeeza Hussain and Osprey Orielle Lake

On November 16th, WECAN presented an UNFCCC COP22 press conference, during which powerful women leaders spoke out to present their climate change struggles and solutions, and to disrupt business as usual and demand system change, not climate change. WECAN was honored to have the opportunity to present this press conference and amplify the voices of frontline, grassroots and Indigenous women from around the world, who are too often not present to speak for themselves within spaces such as COP22.

Ruth Nyambura of the African Eco-Feminists Collective, NO REDD in Africa Network and Health of Mother Earth Foundation, Kenya spoke out as one of the outstanding press conference speakers, explaining, “It’s very clear the the issue of climate change is first and foremost an issue of systemic and structural inequalities that march together. So, we need to re-imagine and transform our economic systems. As women and as feminists, we know too well what happens when we have the externalization of the costs of a capitalist, patriarchal system – and especially with the extractive industries. We understand what it means to have our waters privatized, our soils contaminated, our foods privatized. And so we must imagine an economic system that doesn’t just benefit the few corporations, the North, but actually provides economic justice, because that is something that we rarely talk about…These are fundamental issues we must sort out if we really want to talk about what climate justice is. Climate justice is not a word in a vacuum…we really need to go back to the heart of the matter, and we really need to challenge market based techno-fixes. We cannot solve the climate crisis and the triple crisis of food, water and climate using the same tools that created the current crisis…As much as we are in a dangerous space, there are so many beautiful stories of resistance and we must allow those to carry us through in this period of time.”

We send the deepest thanks to press conference speakers – Thilmeeza Hussain (Voice of Women; Climate Wise Women, Maldives); Neema Namadamu (SAFECO; Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network Democratic Republic of Congo); Ruth Nyambura (African Eco-Feminists Collective; NO REDD in Africa Network; Health of Mother Earth Foundation, Kenya): Marta Ventura (Mayan Peoples, Abya Yala Women Messengers, Guatemala); and Osprey Orielle Lake (Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, USA).

Click here to watch the full WECAN COP22 press conference – Women for Climate Justice Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change  

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Neema Namadamu (left) of SAFECO and WECAN DR Congo and Thilmeeza Hussain of Climate Wise Women and Voice of Women, Maldives, speak out during WECAN’s frontline women press conference

Side Event – Women for Climate Justice Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change

During WECAN’s official COP22 side event, women leaders from around the world spoke truth to power, shared vital stories and climate solutions, and refused to shy away from the pressing realities about our global climate crisis and the need for just, women-led action NOW.  

During the event, Thilmeeza Hussain of the Maldives poignantly explained, “400,000 people are dying every year because of climate change – this is an ecocide that is happening, this is a genocide, this is criminal. We are letting this fossil fuel industry rule our planet and many of our politicians are in their pockets…there is no time to wait until tomorrow, all of us have a moral obligation and responsibility to stand up and speak out – this is not a fight between the developed and the developing, this is not a fight between rich and poor countries, this is a fight between those who are willing to act on climate and those who refuse to act. This is a fight between those who are speaking out and those who choose to stay silent. What we choose to do today will determine the course of the future, our children’s future. We must stand together.”

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Pictured left to right: Thilmeeza Hussain (Maldives), Neema Namadamu (DR Congo), Marta Ventura (Guatemala), Cecilia Flores (Chile), Precious Phiri (Zimbabwe), Sadie-Phoenix Lavoie (Canada) and Carmen Capriles (Bolivia)

We thank everyone who attended and packed this event to capacity, and honor the outstanding presenters – Neema Namadamu (SAFECO; Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network Democratic Republic of Congo); Thilmeeza Hussain (Voice of Women; Climate Wise Women, Maldives); Marta Ventura (Mayan Peoples, Abya Yala Women Messengers, Guatemala); Cecilia Flores (Aymara Peoples, Abya Yala Women Messengers, Chile); Precious Phiri (Regeneration International; EarthWisdom, Zimbabwe); Sadie-Phoenix Lavoie (Anishinaabe Peoples from Sagkeeng First Nation; Red Rising Magazine; University of Winnipeg Students’ Association, Canada); Carmen Capriles (Reacción Climática, Bolivia); Osprey Orielle Lake (Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, USA)

Click here to listen to the full audio of WECAN’s official COP22 side event and hear directly from extraordinary women for climate justice from around the world.

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WECAN COP22 side event speakers stand together in solidarity and action at the end of the event. Speakers and attendees together filled the room with cries of ‘act on climate’ and ‘water is life’

Press Conference – Indigenous Rights and Rights of Nature: Foundations for Systemic Change in Climate Solutions

Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, shared the critical work of the Rights of Nature movement during a COP22 press conference on November 17 – speaking out against the continued commodification of the Earth’s living systems within the UNFCCC process, and presenting an alternative vision for a legal and economic system founded upon respect for the inherent rights of our life giving mountains, forests, waters and soils.

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Osprey Orielle Lake of WECAN International presents a Rights of Nature press conference inside COP22

This press conference was originally to be presented in partnership with the Indigenous Environmental Network, however urgent matters in Standing Rock rightfully prevented their presence. As such, the dynamic press conference focused on Rights of Nature. WECAN International is honored to present this work in partnership with the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature.

Click here to watch the full WECAN COP22 press conference –  Indigenous Rights and Rights of Nature: Foundations for Systemic Change in Climate Solutions

Stand With Standing Rock Solidarity Action & Other Actions Inside COP22

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November 15 prayer circle and action. Photo via SustainUS.

From Morocco to North Dakota – we stand with Standing Rock. On the November 15th Day of Action for Standing Rock, held nationally in the U.S., WECAN was honored to join a prayer circle and solidarity action held at the entrance to the COP22 venue, with the leadership of Indigenous youth delegates and Indigenous allies with SustainUs.

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Global Indigenous leaders hold a Standing Rock Solidarity action inside of COP22 on Nov 17

On November 17th, we took action again inside of the formal UN space, uniting with allies from the Indigenous Environmental Network, Global Grassroots Justice Alliance, Climate Justice Alliance and global Indigenous peoples to support this Indigenous-lead action, and to hear testimony and strong messages to world governments and to connect Indigenous struggles for sovereignty, water and life across the globe.

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Niria Alicia of the SustainUs delegation speaks out during the Standing Rock action inside COP22

During COP22, WECAN team members and delegates also took part in direct actions to declare that ‘We’re still in’ and ‘We will move head’ – making clear that civil society members, and communities and countries around the world will forge ahead for climate action regardless of the deeply troubling results of the recent U.S. election.

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Members of U.S. delegations and global allies gather inside of COP22 to declare that the peoples movement for climate justice will take action on climate regardless of the results of the recent U.S. election

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Civil society members and international delegates gather to send a strong message at the close of COP22 – we will forge ahead for strong climate action no matter the roadblocks faced

WECAN Delegation Member Advocacy

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WECAN Executive Director, Osprey Orielle Lake, strategizes with WECAN allies & delegation members, Thilmeeza Hussain of the Maldives, & Carmen Capriles of Bolivia

WECAN International was thrilled to have a strong global delegation on the ground, who in addition to advocacy efforts, presentations and participating in WECAN actions and events, also led out individual work to meet with their regional representatives; build partnerships; and advocate and engage directly within the negotiating process.

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Carmen Capriles, WECAN COP22 delegation member and Founder of Reaccion Climatica presents the final Women and Gender Constituency intervention at 2:00 am on the last night of COP22

Carmen Capriles, longtime WECAN partner, delegation member, and Founder of Reaccion Climatica in Bolivia, was an active participant in the UNFCCC Women and Gender Constituency throughout the COP22 process. At 2:00 am on the final night of COP22, Carmen presented an inspiring final intervention on behalf of the Women and Gender Constituency, which can be read in full here. She also made a dynamic presentation at WECAN’s side event and kindly provided Spanish translation to various WECAN events and meetings, helping amplify the voices of women from across Latin America.

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Neema Namadamu of SAFECO and WECAN DR Congo shares her story and climate solutions with government officials, educators and journalists from around the world

Neema Namadamu, Director of SAFECO and WECAN Coordinator for the Democratic Republic of Congo was a main spokesperson during all WECAN events, and spent time meeting with African ministers and representatives, journalists and students to share her incredible work re-foresting the Itombwe Rainforest of Congo. Through this joint WECAN/SAFECO Women and Forest project, Neema and rural women from across the Itombwe region have planted more than 25,000  diverse trees, supporting the local women’s economy, health and sustenance base, while mitigating climate change and protecting the cultural and ecologic biodiversity of the region.

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Thilmeeza Hussain of the Maldives speaks out during a WECAN COP22 press conference

Thilmeeza Hussain, WECAN COP22 delegation member, representative of Climate Wise Women, and Founder of Voice of Women, Maldives, spoke out throughout COP22 as a representative of small Island Nations and other vulnerable communities who are experiencing the impacts of ‘climate genocide’ everyday.

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Fadoua Brour, WECAN Co-Coordinator in the MENA region and Founder of the Moroccan Youth Climate Movement and Osprey Orielle Lake of WECAN strategize over dinner in Marrakech

Fadour Brour, WECAN Co-Coordinator for the Middle East/North Africa Region, and Director of the Moroccan Youth Climate Movement was a key organizer of the Conference of the Youth (COY) gathering ,which took place in Marrakech in advance of the climate talks. During COP22, Fadoua led work to strengthen the voices of Moroccan and global youth within the negotiating process and during civil society events. WECAN looks forward to our ongoing work with Fadoua in the MENA region as we act for climate justice.

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Members of the Abya Yala Women’s Delegation from Ecuador, Colombia, Chile and Guatemala with WECAN’s Executive Director

WECAN was also honored to support and collaborate with members of the Abya Yala Women Messengers delegation from South America, including Alicia Cahuiya of the Huaorani Peoples of the Amazon Rainforest, Ecuador. We remain steadfast in our dedication to the protection of the Amazon Rainforest and the Living Forest Proposal presented by the Sarayaku Peoples of Ecuador.

With the Women of the Land

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WECAN team members visit the organic tree nurseries of High Atlas Foundation allies outside of Marrakech

In the days following COP22, members of the WECAN delegation were thrilled to have the opportunity to visit the Ourika Valley of the High Atlas mountains outside of Marrakech.

On one day, WECAN visited a cooperative of women leading the development of sustainable local economies and agriculture through productions of Argan oil. We were delighted to organize with and accompany Her Excellency Hilda Heine, President of the Marshall Islands and her daughter, poet and climate activist Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner on this excursion.

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WECAN team members with H.E. President Hilda Heine and Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner and Farhana Yamin at the women’s Argan oil cooperative in the Ourika Valley outside of Marrakech

During our time together, we learned more about the climate impacts and issues facing the Marshall Islands, including radiation from US nuclear testing; littering and ocean pollution; and rising seas, which pose an immediate and dire threat to the peoples of the Marshall Islands. It was a true pleasure to have time with the President and Kathy to learn more about their ever strengthening work for socio-ecologic justice in their homelands.

The following day, the WECAN team met with local women allies of the High Atlas Foundation (HAF) to visit one of their stunning nursery projects, learn more about their work, and explore points of collaboration and information exchange.

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Osprey Orielle Lake of WECAN and Amina El Hajjami of High Atlas Foundation discuss women’s leadership, biodynamic agriculture, and tree planting as a climate mitigation solution while visiting the nurseries of a local women’s cooperative in the Ourika Valley outside of Marrakech

Under the leadership of Amina El Hajjami, Project Manager for HAF, various women’s cooperative have been formed to work with Indigenous Amazigh (Berber) and rural women across Morocco to plant and distribute trees and medicinal plants to strengthen the local women’s economy and self sufficiency, and to mitigate the impacts of climate change and expanding desertification.

Click here to watch a short interview with Amina about the work of the women’s cooperatives.

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Indigenous Amazigh and rural women leaders meet with the WECAN International team to speak about their women’s cooperative and exchange ideas about women’s leadership and climate change

Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Days of Global Mobilization

From October 28 to November 6, the days immediately proceeding the UNFCCC COP22 in Marrakech, diverse women and girls around the world in organized together to show our resistance to environmental and social degradation; highlight the climate impacts our communities are facing; demand drastic change away from unjust economic and development systems; and demonstrate the many effective, just and safe climate solutions, strategies and political calls that are being implemented by women and girls around the world on a daily basis.

Hundreds of women and allies from over 35 countries and all continents added powerful action photos and statements, and these messages were carried to Morocco by the WECAN delegation, and shared during various events and meetings. Click here to explore powerful actions from around the world collected in the ‘Women Act for Climate Justice – Ten Days of Global Mobilization’ gallery.

WECAN was honored to co-sponsor this campaign with the Women’s Global Call for Climate Justice.

The stories and calls to action shared in the gallery – like the strong voices shared by WECAN delegation members and global allies on the ground during COP22 – ring out with clarity and strength to declare that another world is possible, and that women around the world are already building it day by day. It is far past time for world governments to join women of the world in walking the path of climate justice and immediate, bold and equitable action on climate change.

Click here to explore a full album photo of WECAN Women for Climate Justice at COP22.

Media requests and comments about the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network on the ground during the UNFCCC COP22 Marrakech may be directed to emily@wecaninternational.org

WECAN COP22 Delegation and Women Act for Climate Justice Campaign in the media to date: