Women for Forests Democratic Republic of Congo – Winter 2017 Update

img_9902

In the Itombwe region of the Democratic Republic Congo, the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, in partnership with SAFECO, ongoingly supports local women leaders in the development of tree nurseries and reforestation efforts in the area of Marunde, Rushasha and Malanda, serving 12 surrounding village areas and impact approximately 1,500 people.

The primary goals of this project are the protection of the remaining Itombwe natural forest from deforestation, the regeneration of new forest, and collaboration with and support of the Indigenous Pygmy peoples of the region in the protection of their traditional lifeways and knowledge.

The project also seeks to act as an avenue for climate mitigation through carbon sequestration. The 20,000 trees planted on 35 hectares this last rainy season will be sequestering 350 tons of carbon per year.

In planting tree seedlings, communities are also reducing reliance on the old growth forest for daily needs. Currently, twenty five percent of the trees planted are for human use, and seventy five percent are for regeneration of the land.

By restoring deforested, damaged lands and simultaneously providing an alternative source for sustainable forest harvesting and substenance – the collaborative program seeks to support the needs of the local Indigenous communities concerning forest use, while acting directly to stop deforestation and associated environmental degradation.

img_9964

Between the end of December 2016 and into January 2017, women engaged in this project planted over 20,000 trees by hand.

Tree species being planted at this time include: Eucalyptus,Cyprus, Grevillea, Mimosa Scabrella, Croton megalocarpus, African redwood, Cedrela serrata, Acacia mearnsii, Calliandra calothyrsus and Maracuja.

Mixed plantings of Eucalyptus with other species such as Acacia or Grevillea is being employed as a way to improve soil fertility. Tree species have also been chosen due to characteristics including being fast-growing, desiccation-tolerant, drought-tolerant and adaptable.

The deforestation situation in Itombwe is an alarming condition which needs urgent solutions, and these species and this project are key solutions. For further background and political analysis please see our previous blogs on this project.

Women are the principal stakeholders in this project, and have been working to learn, plan, envision and carry forth construction of the nurseries over the past four years. The women are able to earn money, learn about trees, care for a nursery, and gain support to be able to send their children to school.

Another important benefit from this project concerns the DR Congo forest law, which says that when a community or community member plants a tree or grows a crop, that land becomes their land. By involving women in planting trees, progress is being made to support women in gaining precious land titles to the traditional lands that have previously been unjustly taken from the women and their communities.

 In Itombwe, the planting season is from December to February, and tree nursery development takes place from May to October. With the December to February planting season coming to a close, WECAN and women leaders of DR Congo are looking forward to a new season of tree nursery development from May to October. Many women have expressed interest in joining the program and we are thrilled to see the strength of this program grow as we celebrate the growth of the new trees and the protection of the Itombwe’s natural forests.

Additional photos by Stany Nzabas

img_9888

members-collect-their-bagged-trees-for-plantingmembers-coming-from-far-to-gather-at-nursery

bagging-trees-2-092816-2

WECAN and Climate Women Rising at the Women’s March on Washington

16265201_1558843827477528_8513539861605237684_n

Photo by Emily Arasim/WECAN International

The Women’s March on Washington was a historic moment, as over 5 million women and allies stood in defense of all we hold dear in hundreds of cities across the United States and around the world.

In Washington D.C. the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN), a formal partner to the Women’s March on Washington, co-organized and marched with the Women for Climate Justice contingent – and in solidarity with our allies of Indigenous Women Rising.

We marched to make clear that women of the world refuse to allow the new U.S. administration to further endanger the lives of future generations, and the very web of life itself. We marched to declare our intent to forge ahead for women’s rights, racial justice, immigration rights and environmental justice, because we know they are inextricably linked.

We marched with resolute strength, and in solidarity with our frontline communities, women of color and Indigenous allies, who are simultaneously experiencing the worst impacts of climate change and social injustices, while also leading the way towards the healthy world we seek. In the face of a Trump presidency, we renew and strengthen our calls for urgent action to stop the exploitation of the Earth and its diverse peoples. Today and everyday into the future until just solutions to the social and ecological crises we face are implemented – women will continue to rise to protect and heal the Earth and our communities. We will not be silenced, and we will never stand down – and we know we have much work to do.  

Click here to read a powerful call to action and analysis, published  in the Guardian about the march from the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network’s Founder and Executive Director, Osprey Orielle Lake.

16195867_1558839377477973_2505836876682420317_n

Casey Camp Horinek (Ponca Nation Council Woman & WECAN Advisory Council Member) and Osprey Orielle Lake (WECAN International Executive Director) prepare for the Women’s March 

WECAN was honored to co-host our Advisory Board member and Ponca Nation Tribal Councilwoman, Casey Camp Horinek to participate in the march and key interviews and meetings in Washington D.C.

16143255_1558839764144601_5020527936739600831_n

Casey Camp Horinek (Ponca Nation Council Woman & WECAN Advisory Council Member) marching with the Indigenous Women Rise Contingent at the Women’s March on Washington D.C – Photo by Emily Arasim/WECAN

Along with many allies WECAN also co-created a toolkit for women standing for Climate Justice to organize themselves with common messaging and actions in sister marches nationwide and globally. Many thanks to WEDO, MADRE, Global Grassroots Justice Alliance, Sierra Club and all others involved!

Explore selected coverage of Women for Climate Justice at the Women’s March below:

Click here to view a full WECAN photo album from the Women’s March on Washington D.C.

WECAN was honored to collaborate with many Women for Climate Justice leaders nationwide – read and share statements from diverse leaders in the press release here

More Photos: (full album also here)

16114082_1558841190811125_8213223860237068714_n

Allies from the Women’s Earth and Development Organization prepare for action with the Women for Climate Justice Contingent

16114273_1558839760811268_1917520109709926066_n

Photo by Emily Arasim/WECAN International

16114981_1558841410811103_1677095929272021448_n

With the Indigenous Women Rise Contingent – Photo by Emily Arasim/WECAN International

16195159_1558841177477793_283106187929488399_n

Photo by Emily Arasim/WECAN International